The Dangers of Trusting Cloud Computing Over Personal Storage

Author James Mash 28.6.2016. | 15:09

Cloud computing is now a mainstream trend for organizations and individuals all over the world.  What started as an abstract technology has now been embraced by the industry as the ultimate data storage system and also for overall enterprise applications. The cloud provides instant access to data and businesses are benefiting from its scalability and cost effectiveness. By improving team collaborations the cloud has become an integral part of the contemporary business environment.

However before you fully move your enterprise to the cloud it is important to carefully analyze the implications. Are you overly comfortable with giving over your data to the cloud or would you like some sort of control?  To help you make an informed choice here is a brief overview of the risks that come with the cloud:

 

cloud computing

  1. Security Concerns

 The phrase ‘age of information’ which has been coined to highlight the easy availability of information today has its flipside. With so much information available having control over the same becomes a concern.  Security of your information in the cloud is a major concern.

It is true the cost of cloud computing is moving towards zero but then again this service will have to be monetized at some point. This means the cloud service provider might sell your information to the highest bidder either for advertising purposes or other benefits to the benefactor. This is a scary prospect for any business owner.

 

  1. Risk of Disruptions

 

One common trend in the Silicon Valley is the dizzying pace of buyouts. At one point WhatsApp belongs to a startup and the next moment Facebook has snapped it. Yahoo is at the moment headed to Microsoft. What happens when your cloud service provider is bought out?

Does the buyout include your data? Do you get a notice to download all your data? Will the service terms change?  All these questions about the longevity of the service bring to the fore the risks associated with the cloud.

 

  1. Lack of Standardization

 

Free services always come with a catch. For cloud computing there is a gray area when it comes to standardization of the industry. Who guarantees your data is safe? Which is your last recourse in case of a breach?

Can your service provider be arm twisted by the government to provide access to your data? All these concerns are genuine and because the industry has not yet congealed into a unified sector it is important to confirm what ‘safe’ means from the service provider.

 

  1. Accessibility Concerns

 

The cloud is built around ease of access to data. Your business might not have any concerns about accessibility of the cloud but with more service providers storing their data exclusively in the cloud you should expect to encounter some hiccups.

If you are trying to access your data you might be required by the cloud provider to prove who you are. In such a case it seems like you have given the power of your data to the cloud provider.  When you can’t access important business data you will be staring at losses and legal suits from your clients.

 

There are many concerns about the place of cloud computing in business today.  If you are a marketer oracle marketing services are designed to resolve these concerns by enhancing security, providing support and ensuring effective marketing across all internet platforms.

 


This guest post was written by  Angie Owens, an IT expert, tech writer and consultant at http://listertechnologies.com/. She has worked in the industry for the last 16 years and is a graduate of UC Irvine. You can visit her blog for more detailed information.

Author James Mash 28.6.2016. | 15:09
Write a comment

No Comments

No Comments Yet!

Let me tell You a sad story ! There are no comments yet, but You can be first one to comment this article.

Write a comment
View comments

Write a comment

Leave a Reply

Watch latest gadget videos

Chinavasion Video


action cam

Add Chinavasion on Google+

Add Chinavasion on Facebook

Archive